Harland & Wolff Timekeeping Bourd

£25.00 inc. VAT

78 in stock

Harland & Wolff Timekeeping Bourd

Harland & Wolff  Timekeeping Bourd dates back to the 1860s to the 1970s.

Work in the Yard started early and depending on where you worked you had a specific Entrance to enter and leave by each day.  It was at this Entrance / Timekeepers office you were given your unique Bourd with your individual number stamped into the area between the 2 shoulders.

The first 2 digits represent where you worked i.e. which Trade / Shop you were employed by.  The other 3 digits represented your name.

As the saying goes ‘NoBourd No Pay’, so you ensured you never lost it. The Bourd was kept with you throughout the day.  The exceptions were when you wished to go to the toilet or borrow special equipment.  If you wished to borrow special equipment, you handed your Bourd into the Storeman as a deposit. It would be given back to you when you returned the equipment.  If the equipment was not returned there obviously would be financial implications. as your Bourd would have to be returned at the end of the day to the Timekeeping office.

We have heard many stories of their misuse and how they were thrown into the Cashier office en masse!

Each Timekeeper was responsible for upwards of  400 workers and their Bourds.   They are lovely small tactile objects.  Many are worn smooth with age and handling, some have names on them others have messages of love or hope.  They can be displayed individually or collectively or framed as per the Irish Pickers.

 

78 in stock

Description

Harland & Wolff Timekeeping Bourd

Harland & Wolff  Timekeeping Bourd dates back to the 1860s to the 1970s.

Work in the Yard started early and depending on where you worked you had a specific Entrance to enter and leave by each day.  It was at this Entrance / Timekeepers office you were given your unique Bourd with your individual number stamped into the area between the 2 shoulders.

The first 2 digits represent where you worked i.e. which Trade / Shop you were employed by.  The other 3 digits represented your name.

As the saying goes ‘NoBourd No Pay’, so you ensured you never lost it. The Bourd was kept with you throughout the day.  The exceptions were when you wished to go to the toilet or borrow special equipment.  If you wished to borrow special equipment, you handed your Bourd into the Storeman as a deposit. It would be given back to you when you returned the equipment.  If the equipment was not returned there obviously would be financial implications. as your Bourd would have to be returned at the end of the day to the Timekeeping office.

We have heard many stories of their misuse and how they were thrown into the Cashier office en masse!

Each Timekeeper was responsible for upwards of  400 workers and their Bourds.   They are lovely small tactile objects.  Many are worn smooth with age and handling, some have names on them others have messages of love or hope.  They can be displayed individually or collectively or framed as per the Irish Pickers.

For more information:

If you have any questions or queries on this product please contact us by email at sales@belfastmaritimecollectables.com   We aim to prepare and deliver your chosen item to the Post Office within 48 hours and will keep you informed of all developments along the way.

Additional information

Weight 0.06 kg
Dimensions 3.5 × 0.5 × 7.5 cm

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